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Faculty Mentoring Partner Project

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Webinars

AHRD Webinar: You Get What You Give: Mentoring and Inspiring People to Lead

Dr. Laura L. Bierema

Listen to the Webinar Here

Professor, associate dean, executive coach, company president, author, founder Lukas’ Fund, past faculty senate president, volunteer, avid runner sidelined by injury, ex-executive, cyclist, nonprofit board member, former dental assistant, disastrous waitress, rusty choral singer, failed pianist, aspiring potter, fumbling knitter, and a decent consensus builder on her good days.

Laura L. Bierema is Professor, University of Georgia, College of Education (COE). Her academic program is in Adult Learning, Leadership, and Organization Development.  Prior to joining UGA, Dr. Bierema was Assistant Professor in the School of Labor and Industrial Relations at Michigan State University where she also worked in faculty development in the College of Human Medicine.  Before her career in academia, Dr. Bierema held a variety of human resources management and executive positions in the automotive industry with AlliedSignal, Inc. (now Honeywell). From 2013-1016 Dr. Bierema was the UGA COE Associate Dean for Academic Programs.

Dr. Bierema’s research interests include workplace learning, career development, women’s development, organization development, executive coaching, leadership, and critical human resource development.  Dr. Bierema holds both bachelors and masters degrees from Michigan State University and a doctorate in adult education from the University of Georgia. She has published over 50 articles that have appeared in both research and professional publications. Dr. Bierema’s books include:

  • Women’s Career Development across the Lifespan: Insights and Strategies for Women, Organizations, and Adult Educators
  • Philosophy and Practice of Organizational Learning, Performance, and Change
  • Critical Issues in Human Resource Development
  • Implementing a Critical Approach to Organization Development
  • Adult Learning: Linking Theory and Practice
  • An Introduction to Organization Development

Dr. Bierema is a Cyril O. Houle Scholar in Adult and Continuing Education and Lilly Fellow.  She is the recipient of the Richard A. Swanson Excellence in Research Award and four Academy of Human Resource Development’s “Cutting Edge” Awards for best conference paper. She is the 2009 recipient of the Highly Commended Award by the Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence; 2012 winner of the University of Georgia College of Education Russell H. Yeany, Jr. Research Award; 2012 recipient of the Sherpa Trailblazer of the Year Award in recognition of innovation application of the Sherpa Coaching Process; 2013 winner of the Academy of Human Resource Development’s Outstanding Scholar Award; 2014 winner of the Academy of Human Resource Development’s Book of the Year; and 2015 winner of the University, Professional, and Continuing Education Association Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature.

Lest Dr. Bierema take herself too seriously, she balances her left brain by learning to knit, talking to her dogs, riding her bicycle around the world with her spouse Mark, tasting fine wines, collecting original art, cooking gourmet vegetarian meals, reading great literature and trashy novels, traveling to interesting places near and far, indulging in gastronomic adventures with friends, and hitting the beach whenever possible, preferably in Onekama, MI.   

Listen to the Webinar Here

Faculty Mentoring Program Opportunity

We are excited to continue the AHRD Faculty Mentoring Partners Program (FMPP) we launched in 2015 to address the career/professional development needs of HRD faculty across different career levels (i.e., junior, mid-career, senior). Twenty pairs (40 faculty) have completed the FMPP in the last three years.

This program is a great chance to expand your HRD professional network, learn new skills, and help meet your professional goals. Interested faculty should submit the participant input form (available here) to rajashi.ghosh@drexel.edu by Jan 15, 2018.

A “meet and greet” will be scheduled at the upcoming AHRD conference to allow participants to meet each other and consider who they might like to work with over the course of the year.

Mentoring Partners

To promote a mutual partnership, AHRD is opting for a relational mentoring model where participating faculty will be mentoring partners to each other (Ragins & Verbos, 2007; Ragins, 2011). In other words, both parties in the mentoring relationship can be mentors and/or mentees depending on their developmental needs. Rotating the mentor/mentee roles between each other will enable them to reciprocate each other's learning.

For example, a junior HRD faculty can be a mentee when he/she is learning from a senior or a mid-career HRD faculty (enacting a mentor's role) about how to publish in HRD journals. The same junior HRD faculty can mentor the mid-career/senior HRD faculty on a new topical area that is gaining traction in HRD research in recent years (e.g., engagement, incivility etc.).

This model emphasizes two-way learning characterizing high-quality developmental relationships and challenges the traditional notion that views mentoring as a top-down hierarchical relationship where one who is relatively senior in the relationship typically assumes the mentor's role (Ghosh, Reio, & Haynes, 2012).

Voluntary Input in Matching

The participating faculty will be allowed to choose their top 3 preferred mentoring partners from the list of all participants in this program. So, for example, if 10 faculty participants have enrolled, each faculty will be asked to choose 3 mentoring partners from the list of 9 participants for themselves.

Each faculty participant will complete a "Mentoring Partner choice Form" where they will need to justify their choice by explaining why their chosen mentoring partners are best suited/prepared to meet their developmental needs and how they are best suited to meet their chosen partners' developmental needs. Developmental needs of all participating faculty will be made available to inform these choices.

Once each participating faculty has indicated their 3 preferred mentoring partners, the Mentoring Program team will facilitate the pairing/matching by ensuring that they are paired with one of their 3 preferred mentoring partners.

Seeking voluntary input into matching/pairing will help to build ownership of the mentoring partnerships among the participants (Allen, Eby, & Lentz, 2006; Hegstad & Wentling, 2004).

Developmental Network Approach

The participating faculty need to remember that the mentoring partnership they will develop in this program will be ONE developmental relationship among many they can establish for their professional and personal growth.

So, this program is not promising to meet all of their developmental needs as it is not possible for one mentoring partner to meet all developmental needs (Dobrow, Chandler, Murphy, & Kram, 2012; Higgins & Kram, 2001).

It is to provide an “in-discipline” resource that helps each support the development needs of each partner. Each faculty will be encouraged to consider their mentoring partnership as a valuable resource in their developmental network which will include other developmental relationships inside or outside the AHRD.


References

  1. Allen, T. D., Eby, L. T., & Lentz, E. (2006). The relationship between formal mentoring program characteristics and perceived program effectiveness. Personnel Psychology, 59(1), 125-153.
  2. Dobrow, S. R., Chandler, D. E., Murphy, W. M., & Kram, K. E. (2012). A review of developmental networks incorporating a mutuality perspective. Journal of Management, 38(1), 210-242.
  3. Ghosh, R., Reio, T. G., & Haynes, R. K. (2012). Mentoring and organizational citizenship behavior: Estimating the mediating effects of organization‐based self‐esteem and affective commitment. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 23(1), 41-63.
  4. Hegstad, C. D., & Wentling, R. M. (2004). The development and maintenance of exemplary formal mentoring programs in Fortune 500 companies. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 15(4), 421-448.
  5. Higgins, M. C., & Kram, K. E. (2001). Reconceptualizing mentoring at work: A developmental network perspective. Academy of Management Review, 26(2), 264-288.
  6. Ragins, B. R. (2011). Relational mentoring: A positive approach to mentoring at work. The handbook of positive organizational scholarship, 519-536.
  7. Ragins, B. R., & Verbos, A. K. (2007). Positive relationships in action: Relational mentoring and mentoring schemas in the workplace. Exploring positive relationships at work: Building a theoretical and research foundation, 91-116.

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