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Faculty Mentoring Partner Project

Join the AHRD 2017 Faculty Mentoring Partner Program Cohort!

If you are interested in participating in the 2017 cohort of the AHRD Faculty mentoring partner program, please complete the Participant Input Form and email the completed form to Rajashi Ghosh at rajashi.ghosh@drexel.edu by January 15, 2017. Deadline extended to January 25 (as of 2017-01-12)

There will be a Mentoring Meet & Greet Session at the 2017 AHRD Conference in the Americas in San Antonio, Texas!


Latest News

Dr. Belle Rose Ragins - photo courtesy of University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Many thanks to Dr. Belle Rose Ragins for a fabulous Webinar on Dec 9 on High quality Mentoring!!


Mentoring Meet & Greet Session at the 2017 AHRD Conference

More details to come.

Resources

Webinars

The Kick-off Webinar will be posted soon!

Mentoring Partners

To promote a mutual partnership, AHRD is opting for a relational mentoring model where participating faculty will be mentoring partners to each other (Ragins & Verbos, 2007; Ragins, 2011). In other words, both parties in the mentoring relationship can be mentors and/or mentees depending on their developmental needs. Rotating the mentor/mentee roles between each other will enable them to reciprocate each other's learning.

For example, a junior HRD faculty can be a mentee when he/she is learning from a senior or a mid-career HRD faculty (enacting a mentor's role) about how to publish in HRD journals. The same junior HRD faculty can mentor the mid-career/senior HRD faculty on a new topical area that is gaining traction in HRD research in recent years (e.g., engagement, incivility etc.).

This model emphasizes two-way learning characterizing high-quality developmental relationships and challenges the traditional notion that views mentoring as a top-down hierarchical relationship where one who is relatively senior in the relationship typically assumes the mentor's role (Ghosh, Reio, & Haynes, 2012).

Voluntary Input in Matching

The participating faculty will be allowed to choose their top 3 preferred mentoring partners from the list of all participants in this program. So, for example, if 10 faculty participants have enrolled, each faculty will be asked to choose 3 mentoring partners from the list of 9 participants for themselves.

Each faculty participant will complete a "Mentoring Partner choice Form" where they will need to justify their choice by explaining why their chosen mentoring partners are best suited/prepared to meet their developmental needs and how they are best suited to meet their chosen partners' developmental needs. Developmental needs of all participating faculty will be made available to inform these choices.

Once each participating faculty has indicated their 3 preferred mentoring partners, the Mentoring Program team will facilitate the pairing/matching by ensuring that they are paired with one of their 3 preferred mentoring partners.

Seeking voluntary input into matching/pairing will help to build ownership of the mentoring partnerships among the participants (Allen, Eby, & Lentz, 2006; Hegstad & Wentling, 2004).

Developmental Network Approach

The participating faculty need to remember that the mentoring partnership they will develop in this program will be ONE developmental relationship among many they can establish for their professional and personal growth.

So, this program is not promising to meet all of their developmental needs as it is not possible for one mentoring partner to meet all developmental needs (Dobrow, Chandler, Murphy, & Kram, 2012; Higgins & Kram, 2001).

It is to provide an “in-discipline” resource that helps each support the development needs of each partner. Each faculty will be encouraged to consider their mentoring partnership as a valuable resource in their developmental network which will include other developmental relationships inside or outside the AHRD.


References

  1. Allen, T. D., Eby, L. T., & Lentz, E. (2006). The relationship between formal mentoring program characteristics and perceived program effectiveness. Personnel Psychology, 59(1), 125-153.
  2. Dobrow, S. R., Chandler, D. E., Murphy, W. M., & Kram, K. E. (2012). A review of developmental networks incorporating a mutuality perspective. Journal of Management, 38(1), 210-242.
  3. Ghosh, R., Reio, T. G., & Haynes, R. K. (2012). Mentoring and organizational citizenship behavior: Estimating the mediating effects of organization‐based self‐esteem and affective commitment. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 23(1), 41-63.
  4. Hegstad, C. D., & Wentling, R. M. (2004). The development and maintenance of exemplary formal mentoring programs in Fortune 500 companies. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 15(4), 421-448.
  5. Higgins, M. C., & Kram, K. E. (2001). Reconceptualizing mentoring at work: A developmental network perspective. Academy of Management Review, 26(2), 264-288.
  6. Ragins, B. R. (2011). Relational mentoring: A positive approach to mentoring at work. The handbook of positive organizational scholarship, 519-536.
  7. Ragins, B. R., & Verbos, A. K. (2007). Positive relationships in action: Relational mentoring and mentoring schemas in the workplace. Exploring positive relationships at work: Building a theoretical and research foundation, 91-116.

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